Into the Mist

During the free weekend in San Juan, a group of us decided to take this chance to climb and sleep on top of Volcan Acatenango. We knew it would be a long, hard hike and we knew it would be a long, cold night of no sleep, but the view would make it all worth it, right? Yes this statement did prove to be true…eventually.

Our day began at 6:30 in the morning, writing to be driven to the base of the volcano. We began with plenty of food, warm clothes, and 4 litres of water strapped to our backs (or strapped to a horse). Even at our starting point it was cold, making us wonder if we packed enough layers. Peter assured us that the clouds would clear and the sun would shine, so we began our journey with positive attitudes.

The clouds did not clear. The sun did not shine. We were pelted with wind and rain as we climbed and there was no knowing what was around the next corner.

We arrived at the top cold, tired and without a satisfying view to justify the pain in our legs. For all we knew we were only half way up or on another planet. We set up our tents in the rain, only to discover that they were not made for rain. As Owen tried to attach the fly to his tent, it proceeded to rip, but Emily-Ann’s rain poncho was a pretty good substitute. Once we were all set up there was nothing to do except huddle together and try to keep warm. Take note: having seven people in a three man tent can keep you pretty warm. With nothing better to do outside and a strong desire to not leave the heat of the tent, we laid there for about 5 hours until someone braved the cold to start the fire for supper. Andrew’s deck of cards helped to pass the time. I couldn’t help but laugh that we hiked for four hours only to sit in our tent.

We survived the night, getting dripped on and hoping that our tent wouldn’t collapse under the force of the wind. I woke up in the morning to the excited shouting of guys seeing blue sky for the first time in 20 hours, even if it only lasted for 10 seconds before the clouds rolled in again. From inside out tent, we got the update on how it was looking from Owen: “I can see more than I could yesterday. But I still see nothing at all”.

It really was beginning to clear up, so we decided to climb to the very peak hoping to see what we came for. We were not disappointed. From the top we saw an infinity of rolling clouds, mountains, and volcanoes-beauty that only God could design.

Our hike down was full of laughter as we half jogged, half galloped down the trail. The only thing we suffered, were our noses being clogged with dirt. All in all we laughed, we cried, and we promised to never make fun of the boys for wearing their ugly ponchos again, because that was the warmest piece of clothing I have ever worn.

-Tara-

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Retiro at El Retiro

After a long week of mud and rain, the heat of Lanquin was a bit of a shock to the system. The sun was hot and shining everyday, prime time for laundry. I think that we all appreciate washing machines on a deeper level since arriving in Guatemala. I found the hostel to be a bit of culture shocking. We just came from a small community up in the mountains, to a touristy hostel. We partook in buffets, turned on lights with the flick of a switch and used toilets that had a flushing feature. All these luxuries took a couple of days to get used to again. I could not help but remember our humble experience with our Mayan host families.

Remembrance aside, this was a week for exploration. The main attraction in Lanquin is Semuc Champey, a collection of stunning blue and green pools formed by mineral deposits. The day was hot and water was refreshing to swim in. You could jump off the edge of one pool into the next continuously.

After swimming was the very exciting caving. The water in the cave was not as cold as I expected and the guides were true to their word when they said we would have to swim some parts. Using dirt from the walls they gave us all fierce face paint and candles that gave everything and ancient glow. The only danger was dunking your candle or getting it blown out by mischief-makers. The rest of the day we went river tubing, rope swinging and a stomach-dropping jump from a bridge. A fun time had by all, with the exception of a few bruises. The rest of our time at the hostel was spent swimming or just lazing about in hammocks.

For the weekend we headed off Denny’s Beach on Lake Izabel. This was a picturesque spot with waterside palm trees and a long dock. This was where some people encountered whole shrimp, head and all, for the first time, whole crab was also on the menu. Others chose the safe path with a burger and fries. In the morning we took a boat across the lake to visit Las Cascades Calientes(The Hot Waterfalls). A hot spring falls into a river, making the pool a lovely lukewarm temperature. Standing on the rocks under the falls was like standing under a very hot shower that smelled like sulfur. This little known natural wonder allowed us to appreciate just how beautiful God’s creation is. We left reluctantly and turned our minds back to San Juan and our host families.

It was a week for relaxation and rejuvenation. It was also really nice to be able to reconnect as a group and live in close community with each other.

-Raelene-

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Treasures not Scavengers

Our short visit to Guatemala City gave us only a small glimpse of the life that was being lead there. One bumpy bus ride brought us straight to the city’s dump community and within it we met the organization, Potter’s House. During our orientation with them, we learned at Potter’s House that many of the people living in the surrounding neighbourhoods made a living by scavenging through the dump, searching for materials that they can potentially resell or recycle. However, rather than labeling these people based on their lifestyle, Potter’s House chooses to call them “Treasures”.
(At first I thought I understood what they meant by that term and took the definition generally. We are all God’s treasures and to Him we are all the apple of his eye.)
Splitting into groups, with a translator for each team, we dispersed into the neighbourhood with 3 grocery bags of food in hand. With the bags of food, each group visited 3 families and got a chance to get to know them and their stories. There my group was able to meet families, some more broken than others, but all sharing various blessings and a beautiful hope and love for their children. Due to our experiences in the Urban Plunges in Canada from our last semester, I was expecting to see a poverty similar to what we saw then as well as what we have seen so far in Guatemala. Though the shock and awe was no longer there, I was expecting to leave the experience with a sense of discouragement and unsettlement. But spending the short time that we had with the families, we saw how much the parents of each family only wanted what was best for their children as they recounted the blessings and misfortunes that they have and have had in their lives. As we listened and asked more questions, they showed us kindness and hospitality towards us.
We left each family with a prayer and a bag of food as a way of showing our love and God’s love to them. The discouragement and feeling of unsettlement were still there, but smaller than I thought and I left feeling encouraged, hopeful and in some ways, wondering where the strength of these families come from.
Back at Potter’s House, we also had the opportunity to spend a meal with the children that the organization serves lunch to. Later at a different location, we were able to run a VBS program for the children in the community where we sang songs, performed a skit, and taught crafts.
The people living in the dump community are truly treasures in the midst of a lot of darkness and where I thought I would find mostly brokenness (and frankly, garbage), I found something much more beautiful, shining and loved very much by God.
The rest of our time in Guatemala City was an educative one in a school called Semilla. There we listened to lectures from two very knowledgeable men, Hector and Fabian. Both talked to us about the history, culture and religion of the country, explaining to us how the combination of different cultures in Guatemala has created new identities within the country over time. Our last visit was to a museum titled “Porque estamos como estamos” (“Why we are the we are”). There we learned more of the different races, cultures and identities in Guatemala and how they have changed or stayed the same.
Though it was a short weekend, it was a fulfilling experience with much to learn and it is exciting to see what else we will experience and learn from the rest of our time here in Guatemala.

– E. Joan Lee

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Nothing is normal

I can say that I am not surprised that our time here in Guatemala is flying by. I find it so true in life how the most exciting moments of our lives always seem to slip through our fingers, and we only wished that we held on to those moments a little bit longer. So as we have passed the halfway mark for our time in this beautiful country, slowly we are recognizing that what we have, and where we are is something rare, and that this experience is unlike anything we will ever experience again. I wonder how this experience will shape every single one of us. God spoke to us before Outtatown, a gentle whisper that drew us to leave our homes, and step out on this big adventure. One of my favourite quotes from Donald Miller is, “It’s funny how you can’t ask difficult questions in a familiar place, how you have to stand back a few feet and see things in a new way before you realize nothing that is happening to you is normal. The trouble with you and me is we are used to what is happening to us. We grew into our lives like a kernel beneath the earth, never able to process the enigma of our composition…Nothing is normal. It is all rather odd, isn’t it, our eyes in our heads, our hands with five fingers, the capacity to understand beauty, to feel love, to feel pain.” I believe that is one of the beautiful invitations God has for us on a year quite like this, and it is inevitable that we come out of this experience knowing a bit more of ourselves, the world, and a lot more of who our God is.

That is what this semester has been so far. We have been able to enter into one of the most beautiful, hospitable cultures that exist in this world. We have been touched by the love and care of host families that six weeks ago we didn’t even know. We have been amazed by the incredible beauty that Guatemala has both in its people and landscape. We have lounged by lakes surrounded by volcanoes, made tortillas in the heights of Chicacnab, and swam in the depths of darkened caves. We have heard stories of believers chase after God and are a part of that journey by helping build a house. We came to bless but instead were blessed. We’ve jumped off cliffs, bridges, and swung off giant swings and have lived to tell the tale. We’ve gone on the journey of learning a new language; in hopes that we can build deeper relationships with the people we meet.

Definitely we are being faced with the questions: Who are we? Who is God? And how does he continue to be in relationship with his creation? In all that we have been learning thus far, it is an encouraging thought to think that God is still not done here. So to our friends, and our family, thank you for keeping up with us, and as this marks the halfway part of our journey here in Guatemala, continue to pray for us as we continue to dive into these questions that we’ve dared to ask.

Peace, love and every good thing.

-Darin-

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Coban

As a group we had the opportunity to venture out to the Coban, a region in northern Guatemala, and we partnered with Rob & Tara Caihil, an American couple who have started an organization called Community Cloud Forest Conservation. We were with Rob and Tara for a week and in that time we were going to help out around their farm, and get the opportunity for a Mayan homestay. To introduce Rob and Tara a bit more, they are a part of CCFC, and the mission of their organization is to educate the residents of over 30 surrounding villages on subsistence farming and teaching how to add more nutrition and balance to their diets by growing a variety of fruits and vegetables. In addition to that, every November they have a leadership program for young Mayan girls where they can come to the farm for 25 days and learn about agriculture, healthy meal preparation and leadership. They are also eligible to receive a Q1000 scholarship that can be put towards furthering their education. Within these Mayan villages it is not common for girls to continue their education past grade 6 mainly because education is expensive, therefore boys get priority in the family. So Rob and Tara’s program is very much geared to promote education among these girls, but more importantly they put a huge emphasis on showing these girls that they are worth it, and they deserve education just as much as anybody else.

We spent the majority of our time in Coban in the dark. Literally. We started off with a spiritual retreat lead by Rob where we were able to dive into the Bible and listen to what God had to say to us. Rob led us in a great reflection of what it means to step out from the margins to come before Jesus. Monday morning came a long and our week of service began. There were various work projects waiting for us such as: sifting rocks, moving trees, cutting branches with machetes, agriculture projects and helping out with a class of 21 kids, ages 10-14 from a small, remote Mayan village in the Mountains, the same village we would be having our homestays.

I ended up in the class with the kids for the week, and it was an unforgettable experience. The kids spoke a Mayan language called Kekchi as well as various levels of Spanish. I found it a challenge communicating with the kids, but it was also fun too! Communication looked different for each person. I connected with the kids by pointing at random objects, learning the word in Kekchi and teaching them the same word in English. I found it especially funny when I learned the word for bread (Cash-lan-guoi), the kids kept saying it to me for the entire week. I literally felt like a celebrity, as they would follow me around everywhere, constantly yelling my name. Occasionally they would attack me with leaves, or with tickles (the worst!). However it was nice to see kids fight over who would hold my hand. When Thursday came, we were put into partners and matched with one of the kids from the village we were going to be staying. The homestay was such a unique and eye opening experience for me. I was partnered with Raelene and we stayed with a little girl named Ana and her family. I love all the kids, but Ana has a special place in my heart. Her parents died three years ago when she was at the age of 9 and her little sister was 3. Since then she has lived with her grandparents, aunt and uncle and her five boy cousins. I saw a huge overwhelming sense of courage in Ana. My heart was breaking when I had to say goodbye at the end of the homestay. However, I have great memories of laughing, making tortillas, playing cards and playing “snap”. Watching the kids play brought so much joy to my heart. While watching them I noticed how happy they were. The houses are nothing spectacular and families struggle to get by, yet they are still happy and are willing and ready to open up their homes and share what little they had with us. I realized how small of a priority material things are in their lives. For me it was such a privilege to partake in this humbling and eye opening experience. Every single one of the kids is extremely special to me and my week with them was life changing. Honestly, I wasn’t sure what to expect going into the week, but I got more that I could have ever imagined from the entire experience. I want to show as much joy within my own life as these kids have shown me.

-Hunter-

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